3 New Laws And a Minimum Wage Increase Take Effect Jan. 1 in Illinois

3 New Laws And a Minimum Wage Increase Take Effect Jan. 1 in Illinois

Generally this time of year, we put together a roundup of some of the more-interesting laws that take effect in Illinois on Jan. 1.

Sometimes there are scores of new laws to choose from, and it’s difficult to pick which ones to highlight.

In this pandemic year, there are three — plus a minimum wage increase that kicks in on Jan. 1 that was part of a bill that passed back in 2019.

Illinois Department of Labor Issues Minimum Wage Hike Reminder

Illinois’ minimum wage is set to increase to $11 an hour on Friday, Jan. 1, 2021. The Illinois Department of Labor is encouraging employees to watch their paychecks to ensure that time worked in 2021 is paid at the new rate.

Gov. JB Pritzker signed legislation into law in 2019 providing a path to a $15 minimum wage by 2025.

Minimum wage earners received two increases in 2020 to $9.25 an hour on Jan. 1 followed by an increase to $10 an hour on July 1. The minimum wage will continue to increase an additional $1 an hour each Jan. 1 until it reaches $15 an hour in 2025.

Prior to the 2020 increases, the last time Illinois increased its minimum wage was more than a decade ago in 2010 when it was raised to $8.25.

Cook County has a higher minimum wage than the state, currently $13 an hour. The current city of Chicago minimum wage is $13.50 an hour for small employers (four to 20 employees) and $14 an hour for large employers (21 or more employees).

The new law maintains provisions for employers to count gratuities to offset wages for workers such as food servers who regularly earn tips.

Tipped employees may be paid 60% of the hourly minimum wage. These workers must still earn the minimum wage after receiving tips or the employer must make up the difference.

Workers who are under 18 years old and work fewer than 650 hours in a year will earn a minimum wage of $8.50 per hour beginning Jan. 1. The youth minimum wage rate will gradually rise to $13 an hour by 2025.

All Illinois employers are required to post the “Your Rights Under Illinois Employment Laws” in a conspicuous location on the premises of the employer where notices to employees are customarily posted.

The color poster, which also covers other Illinois labor laws, can be found here in English and Spanish: https://www2.illinois.gov/idol/Employers/Pages/posters.aspx

Employees with problems regarding the minimum wage can file a complaint with IDOL at the following link: https://www2.illinois.gov/idol/Pages/Complaints.aspx  or call 312-793-2800.

3 New Laws

Bill Number Sponsor Description
HB 2708 Munoz Creates a process for using DNA to attempt to identify and locate a missing person
HB 2818 Glowiak Hilton Allows sexual assault and stalking survivors to participate in an attorney general-managed address confidentiality program
SB 0667 Manar Creates consumer price caps for insulin for many in-state insurance providers

Of the three new laws, two are public-safety related and one is good news for consumers with a specific health concern.

According to a news release by Illinois Senate Democrats, Senate Bill 667 caps out-of-pocket insulin costs at $100 per month for all patients using a state-regulated insurance plan.

The measure makes Illinois the second state in the U.S. to limit prescription insulin co-pays.

Roughly 1.3 million Illinois residents have diabetes and rely on insulin to manage blood sugar levels, according to state Sen. Andy Manar, who sponsored the bill.

House Bill 2708 establishes a process by which law enforcement can use DNA in attempting to locate and identify a missing person.

The measure allows law enforcement agencies to collect DNA samples of a missing person or to try and create a reference sample from family members – both of which are not allowed under the new law to be retained once the person has been located or identified.

The law also adds the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System to the list of laws that agencies can work with when trying to locate a missing person.

House Bill 2708 establishes a process by which law enforcement can use DNA in attempting to locate and identify a missing person.

The measure allows law enforcement agencies to collect DNA samples of a missing person or to try and create a reference sample from family members. Under the new law, DNA samples are not to be retained once the person has been located or identified.

The law also adds the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System to the list of laws that agencies can work with when trying to locate a missing person.

Finally, House Bill 2818 allows survivors of sexual assault and stalking to keep their home addresses confidential to reduce the risk that their attacker may locate them.

The measure enables people to list the Illinois attorney general’s office as their contact address in some circumstances through the address confidentiality program already established for domestic violence survivors.

SOURCE: state of Illinois